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Dr. Garvey Calls for Greater Unity Among Afro-Caribbean Nationals

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Dr. Julius Garvey, son of Jamaica’s first National Hero, the Rt. Excellent Marcus Mosiah Garvey, has called for greater unity among Afro-Caribbean nationals at home and abroad.

“To a certain extent, we lost our identity and we lost our unity as a people…and this is what he [Marcus Garvey] tried to bring back to us as a people,” Dr. Garvey said, at a reception, held at the Jamaica High Commission in London, on September 30.

Dr. Garvey, who is a renowned New York-based vascular surgeon, is in the United Kingdom (UK) on a five-day tour of London, Birmingham, Manchester and Nottingham, as part of the Black History Month celebrations across Britain, which began on October 1.  His father was a pioneering Black Rights activist and one of the founders of the ‘Back to Africa’ movement.

Emphasising the need to return to “belief systems and principles that go back to the beginning of history,” Dr. Garvey urged people of African descent to think internationally and not follow a history created for them by someone else.

Dr. Garvey said that Afro-Caribbean nationals need to return to Marcus Garvey’s Pan-African principles and values, and that Black History Month alone will not awaken the history and identity of black people in Britain and around the world.

He lamented that much of the African legacy and values has been lost or distorted and as a free people there is a need to fight for social and economic freedom.  He added that black people need to read and write their own history, rather than using that which has been manufactured by others.

Meanwhile, High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, Her Excellency Aloun N’dombet Assamba, praised Dr. Garvey for continuing along the path that his father blazed almost 100 years ago.

“Marcus Garvey was a powerful orator who rallied hundreds of thousands of people in Jamaica and across the world in his quest to deal with discrimination and injustice, and build black economic power. He did so at a time when there was no internet, no telephone, and no modern communications. Imagine the impact he would have had today,” High Commissioner Assamba said.

Contact: Vivienne Siva